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Coug moms and students run in Mom’s Weekend 5K to fight breast cancer

By: Trevor Havard – College of Education Intern5k1

The WSU Sport Management Club’s annual Moms on the Glo 5K couldn’t be stopped by the torrential rain that fell on Saturday during Mom’s Weekend.

Despite the poor weather, approximately 70 cougar moms, students, and others gathered in their bright colors to take part in the Mom’s Weekend 5K event. This annual event raises awareness for breast cancer and the proceeds are donated to the Every Woman Can foundation, who helps women get mammograms who cannot afford them.

According to the American Cancer Society, 68 percent of uninsured women do not get mammograms, which are vital to catching breast cancer early and helping make breast cancer treatable. The Moms on the Glo 5K works to reduce this number and raised over $800 this year for Every Woman Can.

Sport Management Club Event Coordinator Chelsea Gorman was grateful to everyone who came out.5k2

“Even though it was pouring down raining everyone who came out had a great time,” she said. “It was great to see all the runners dressed up and so enthusiastic about our 5K and about helping Every Woman Can.”

Many participants who ran in the race were rewarded for their efforts. Prizes were given out to the fastest and most-spirited participants which included a laser-signed Richard Sherman Seahawks football, Seattle Sounders prize packs, WSU football tickets, and more.5k3edited

The annual 5K event will take place again on Mom’s Weekend next year and will look to help Every Woman Can even more.

First Dominican-born PhD student in WSU history set to graduate

By: Trevor Havard – College of Education Intern

Abraham Barouch-Gilbert, a PhD student in the Educational Psychology program, is believed to become the first Dominican-born PhD graduate in WSU history.Gilbert

“Being the first known Dominican PhD graduate is a great accomplishment and the beginning of a new journey,” he said.

Barouch-Gilbert is not only excited about his current accomplishment, but also what it will allow him to do for the Dominican moving forward.

“It means I have the privilege of contributing directly to Dominican higher education and society at large,” he said. More specifically, Barouch-Gilbert will continue to research student experiences when on academic probation in the Dominican, along with teaching and mentoring processes in higher education.

At WSU, along with being a PhD student Barouch-Gilbert worked as a research assistant for University Recreation performing research and assessments. He received two research grants from his university back home in the Dominican Republic, the Technological Institute of Santo Domingo, with which he produced multiple poster presentations for the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and WSU’s academic showcase, as well as a manuscript that is slated for publication this November, along with two research papers currently under review.

“Upon graduation I will contribute in full to higher education in the Dominican Republic.”

College of Education Professor set to retire after publishing 10th edition of teaching textbook

By Trevor Havard – College of Education Intern

Perhaps the first thing that strikes you is the simplicity of the title: Becoming a Teacher. The straight-forward approach College of Education professor Forest Parkay uses in his textbook is a big reason why the textbook is now getting its tenth edition and is widely used in colleges and universities16871456110_334f68fc0d_z across the United States and world, including in languages like Mandarin and Indonesian.

The book’s milestone could be seen as Parkay’s swan song, with the educational leadership professor retiring at the end of the spring semester.

“I believe that teaching is the world’s most important profession, so it has been immensely satisfying to have spent a career helping to prepare teachers and school leaders,” said Parkay, who taught at the University of Florida for eight years and at Texas State University for five years before coming to WSU. “Since Becoming a Teacher is currently used by nearly 100 colleges and universities in the U.S., I know that I have reached students far beyond the three universities with which I have been affiliated.”

Becoming a Teacher dives head-first into the challenges future teachers face in today’s rapidly-changing, high-stakes educational environment. The tenth edition helps students make difficult decisions on their teaching future by fostering an awareness of the harsh realities of teaching in America in today’s society.

“The book provides students with the tools to answer the questions: Do I want to teach, and what does it take to succeed as a teacher today,” Parkay said.  17033019606_660483b5c3_z

The new edition also puts an added focus on teacher quality and provides students with a greater understanding of key areas such as teacher leadership, political activism, teacher diversity and cultural competence, and social justice and democracy. The book is also available as an eText for the first time and features dozens of interactive videos to help students.

(For more photos see: https://www.flickr.com/photos/118927064@N04/sets/72157651382477289/)

College of Education Graduate Assistant wins 2015 Wiley Research Exposition

By Trevor Havard – College of Education Intern

Doctoral candidate Andy Scheef won a $1,000 scholarship for his research presentation in WSU’s 2015 Wiley Research Exposition.4P7A6149cropped

Scheef is in the College of Education’s special education program.

The Wiley Research Expo is held every spring and gives graduate and professional students the opportunity to showcase their research through either oral or poster presentations, which are then judged by WSU alumni.

This year Scheef took first place in the International Research category for his oral presentation on his research endeavors in Singapore.

Scheef collected interview data last year in Singapore about the world-wide problem of the underemployment of people with disabilities, which Singapore has addressed in recent years by developing school programs to increase opportunities for youth with disabilities.

Scheef explained this problem in his presentation, along with data describing how Singapore schools develop and support relationships with businesses that provide these job training experiences for students.

“Any opportunity to share information is incredibly valuable and the potential to win an award through the process is an added bonus,” Scheef said. “The other presentations in my group were quite strong and I felt lucky to have received the 1st place award.”

Washington State University