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College of Education

Kelly Puzio

Kelly Puzio

Kelly Puzio

Assistant Professor
Language, Literacy, and Technology
Pullman campus
Cleveland hall 329
pullman, WA  99164

509-335-6386
kelly.puzio@wsu.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Kelly Puzio is an assistant professor of Language, Literacy & Technology. Formerly, he was a secondary Language Arts teacher. He was awarded a predoctoral fellowship by the Institute for Education Sciences (2008-2012) and, more recently, he received a Young Scholar award (2013-2017) by the International Reading Association.

Research Interests

With a focus on literacy, Dr. Puzio’s investigates ways that teachers can provide differentiated and culturally relevant instruction. Inquiries about these topics—particularly from prospective doctoral students, teachers, or administrators—are welcome.

Outstanding teachers are remarkable. First, they attend deeply to students. They are keen observers, listeners, and analyzers; they understand students’ misconceptions and interests. Second, they know their subject well and, as they are teaching, they keep their mind on the conceptual horizon (e.g., literary concepts, reading strategies, composition techniques). Because of what they observed today, they do something different tomorrow. Because of students’ responses last year, they adjust their instruction next year. Teaching like this is difficult, especially when teachers have 30 or 130 students.

When teachers deeply understand their students, they sometimes provide special or different instruction for one student or a small group. In educational jargon, this is called differentiated instruction. Although there are a myriad of way to differentiate, teachers typically differentiate by adjusting the complexity of texts/tasks or by letting students pursue topics connected to their interests, culture, or heritage language.

In collaboration with colleagues, he is developing and refining an instructional strategy for bilingual and emerging bilingual students called collaborative translation. Collaborative translation involves six steps: choosing appropriate texts, connecting students to texts, independent reading, sharing the main idea, requesting a translation, and sharing/critiquing those translations. In middle school settings, he has investigated how collaborative translation can be enacted by monolingual and bilingual educators. As a novel way to differentiate instruction, his research shows that collaborative translation supports students’ engagement and understanding of literary concepts such as character and theme.

Recent Publications

Puzio, K., Keyes, C. S., Jiménez, R. T. (in press). Let’s translate! Teaching literary concepts with English language learners. In K. A. Hinchman & D. A. Appleman (Eds.), Adolescent Literacy: A Handbook of Practice-based Research (pp-pp). New York: Guilford.

Puzio, K., Keyes, C. S., Jiménez, R. T. (in press). It sounds more like a gangbanger: Using collaborative translation to understand literary concepts. Language Arts.

Puzio, K., Newcomer, S., & Goff, P. (2015).  Supporting literacy differentiation: The principal’s role in a community of practice.  Literacy Research & Instruction. doi:10.1080/19388071.2014.997944

Newcomer, S., & Puzio, K. (2014). Cultivando confianza: A bilingual community of practice negotiates restrictive language policy. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. doi:10.1080/13670050.2014.983043

Keyes, C. S., Puzio, K., & Jimenez, R. T. (2014). Collaborative translations: Designing bilingual instructional tools. Journal of Education, 194(2), 17-24.

Puzio, K., Keyes, C. S., Cole, M. W., & Jiménez, R. T. (2013). Language differentiation: Collaborative translation to support bilingual readingBilingual Research Journal, 36(3), 329-349. doi:10.1080/15235882.2013.845118.

Puzio, K. & Colby, G. T. (2013). Cooperative learning and literacy: A meta-analytic reviewJournal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, 6(4), 339-360. doi:10.1080/19345747.2013.775683.

Cole, M. W., Puzio, K., Keyes, C. S., Jiménez, R. T., Pray, L., & David, S. (2012). Contesting language orientations: A critical multicultural perspective on local language policy in two middle schools. Middle Grades Research Journal, 7(2), 129-143.

Educational Background

  • Ph.D. Language, Literacy, & Culture, Vanderbilt University, 2012
  • PGCE Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, 2003
  • M.Ed. English Education, DePaul University, 2002
  • B.A. Program of Liberal Studies, University of Notre Dame, 1997
Washington State University