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College of Education

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with Counseling Psychology Specialization

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with a specialization in Counseling Psychology

Contact information

The Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology is no longer accepting applications for admission, with closure of the program planned for the future. The program is currently APA Accredited in Inactive status. For general information, e-mail gradstudies@wsu.edu or call 509-335-9195.

Program overview

As of January 1, 2016, the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology will no longer be accepting applications for admission, or admitting new students, with closure of the program planned for the future. The Ph.D. program in counseling psychology subscribes to the scientist-practitioner model of doctoral training. That is, while graduates are prepared to function as counseling psychologists in a variety of academic and service delivery settings, the common thread of all training is a balance of applied, theoretical, and scientific components in the practice of professional psychology. The curriculum includes course work in theory, research, and techniques in individual and group counseling; psychological assessment; vocational/career counseling and assessment; professional and ethical issues; life-span development; counselor supervision; counseling diverse populations; statistics, measurement, program evaluation, and research design; psychological foundations in the biological, cognitive/affective, social, and individual bases of behavior; and specialty courses in hypnosis, and multicultural counseling and cross-cultural research. In addition, students receive extensive practica and internship experiences and participate in independent or supervised research throughout their programs.

The program is one of approximately 67 counseling psychology Ph.D. programs nationwide accredited by the American Psychological Association and one of only two APA-accredited programs in the Pacific Northwest. Program graduates are able to obtain licensure as psychologists in Washington as well as most other states.

Program graduates obtain positions as staff psychologists in university counseling centers, faculty in academic departments, psychologists in private or group practice, post-doctoral fellows in clinical or research positions, and professional psychologists in other mental health delivery settings. They have a strong foundation in diversity, and are capable of working in a variety of settings with cultural and individual diversity broadly defined. Approximately 57% of current students are from diverse cultural/ethnic backgrounds.

More info

As of January 1, 2016, the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology will no longer be accepting applications for admission, or admitting new students, with closure of the program planned for the future.

Program handbook

As of January 1, 2016, the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology will no longer be accepting applications for admission, or admitting new students, with closure of the program planned for the future.

For more specific information about the program, see the current Ph.D. handbook on the handbooks and forms page.

Program goals and objectives

As of January 1, 2016, the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology will no longer be accepting applications for admission, or admitting new students, with closure of the program planned for the future.

The Counseling Psychology program at Washington State University seeks to train socially responsible scientist-practitioners who demonstrate the highest standards of excellence and ethical behavior in the variety of academic and practice settings in which Counseling Psychologists are employed. Our intent is to train generalists who can function in diverse settings as opposed to narrow specialists. We also seek to train Counseling Psychologists who have a strong foundation in diversity and who are capable of working in a variety of settings with individual and cultural diversity broadly defined. Students may develop expertise in various specialty areas in addition to general skills through the choice of faculty advisor, internship site, elective course work, and dissertation topic area. Students entering the program with a bachelor’s degree can expect to spend four years in full-time on-campus course work and an additional year on internship. Students entering the program with a Master’s degree may waive certain courses, depending on their equivalence, thus shortening their length of time in the program. Our five broad goals and objectives along with corresponding competencies include:

Goal 1: Produce Generalist Counseling Psychologists who skillfully apply theory, assessments, diagnosis, and appropriate interventions.

  • Objective 1A.  Gain knowledge about counseling theories and apply to diagnosis/case conceptualization, treatment plans, and interventions.
    • Competency 1A-1: Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the major counseling theories.
    • Competency 1A-2: Demonstrate the ability to appropriately apply and evaluate theory based interventions.
    • Competency 1A-3: Demonstrate the ability to develop a positive therapeutic alliance with clients and to communicate advanced accurate empathy.
    • Competency 1A-4: Demonstrate the ability to develop and articulate the theoretical basis for their approach to counseling.
    • Competency 1A-5: Demonstrate the ability to develop accurate theory based case conceptualizations and treatment plans.
    • Competency 1A-6: Demonstrate knowledge of psychopathology.
    • Competency 1A-7: Demonstrate the ability to formulate an appropriate diagnosis.
    • Competency 1A-8: Demonstrate knowledge of human growth and development across the life span.
    • Competency 1A-9: Demonstrate ability to integrate knowledge of developmental factors into case conceptualization and treatment plans.
    • Competency 1A-10: Demonstrate the ability to assess and evaluate the outcomes and effectiveness of therapeutic and consultation interventions.
  • Objective 1B: Acquire knowledge that enables students to administer, score, and interpret appropriate assessment tools to determine diagnoses as a basis for appropriate interventions.
    • Competency 1B-1: Demonstrate the knowledge required to administer, score and interpret appropriate assessment tools.
    • Competency 1B-2: Select, competently administer, and interpret case- appropriate assessment tools. Appropriately use assessment tools to inform diagnosis and case conceptualization.

Goal 2: Produce Counseling Psychologists who generate and evaluate scientific knowledge relevant to their professional roles.

  • Objective 2A: Obtain knowledge and skills required to critique and evaluate psychological research.
    • Competency 2A-1: Demonstrate knowledge of theory, research methods, and data analysis in critiquing psychological literature.
    • Competency 2A-2: Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of theory, research methods and data analysis in critiquing the psychological literature.
  •  Objective 2B: Obtain knowledge and skills required to conduct psychological research.
    • Competency 2B-1: Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, conduct, and report all aspects of psychological research including literature review, design, methodology, data collection, analysis, and interpretation.

Goal 3: Produce Counseling Psychologists who consistently apply accepted ethical and legal standards to their work and who exhibit professional integrity.

  • Objective 3A: Obtain knowledge and skills required to apply legal, ethical and professional standards in all aspects of their professional work.
    • Competency 3A-1: Demonstrate the ability to apply legal, ethical, and professional standards in their clinical work.
    • Competency 3A-2: Demonstrate the ability to apply legal, ethical, and professional standards evaluating, conceptualizing and conducting research.
    • Competency 3A-3: Demonstrate professionalism, integrity, and collegiality.
    • Competency 3A-4: Demonstrate efficacy in building and maintaining professional relationships.

Goal 4: Produce Counseling Psychologists who demonstrate sensitivity to issues of diversity and the ability to integrate into their respective professional roles. Produce Counseling Psychologists who have the awareness, knowledge, and skills necessary to address issues of multiculturalism and human diversity broadly defined.

  • Objective 4A: Obtain awareness, knowledge, and skills related to human diversity (broadly defined) and multicultural counseling.
    • Competency 4A-1: Demonstrate knowledge of human diversity (broadly defined).
    • Competency 4A-2: Demonstrate the ability to integrate theory and research in human diversity and multicultural counseling in their conceptualizations, assessments, and interventions with culturally diverse clientele.
    • Competency 4A-3: Demonstrate the ability to apply theory and research in human diversity and multicultural counseling in evaluating, designing, and conducting research.

Goal 5: Produce Counseling Psychologists whose core professional identity is counseling psychology and who also have begun to explore and develop specialty areas that complement this identity and facilitate their career development.

  • Objective 5A: Gain knowledge regarding the status of counseling psychology as a profession within the field of psychology including the differences between counseling psychology and other applied psychology specialties and the types of professional activities in which counseling psychologists are typically engaged.
    • Competency 5A-1: Demonstrate knowledge of roles and activities of Counseling Psychologists including the remedial, preventive, educative, and developmental.
    • Competency 5A-2: Understand the ways these professional roles are implemented through a focus on lifespan development and strengths.
  • Objective 5B: Develop a core professional identity as a generalist Counseling Psychologist.
    • Competency 5B-1: Perform career-related activities consistent with professional counseling psychology.
  • Objective 5C: Through specialized coursework, dissertation topics, and other training experiences, identify an area of specialty.
    • Competency 5C-1: Perform career-related activities consistent with area of specialty.

Special program strength

The program encourages applications from students with a variety of clinical and research interests in counseling psychology. We seek to train generalists rather than narrow specialists. At the same time, the program has some areas of particular strength and focus, based on faculty expertise and interest. Current program emphasis is in multicultural counseling and cross-cultural research.

Other program strengths include the following:

  • High quality practicum placements such as Washington State University’s APA-accredited Counseling and Psychological Services, including comprehensive training, intensive supervision, extensive opportunities for assessment training and experience, and coordination with program faculty to meet student needs and goals. Extremely high success rate in placement of students in APA-accredited pre-doctoral internships across the country.
  • For the past seven years, 46 of our students applied for pre-doctoral internships. Of those who applied:
    • 43 (93%) obtained internships
    • 43 (93%) obtained paid internships
    • 3 (7%) were non-accredited, APPIC member internships
    • 40 (93%) were APA accredited internships
    • 0 (0%) were half-time internships
  • Licensure – Of the 41 program graduates from 2008 to 2018, 35 (88%) that we are aware of have become licensed psychologists to date.
  • Continuous enrollment in supervised research experiences throughout the student’s program.
  • Within the past 7 years, the median time to completion is 6 years with a mean of 6.77 years. The percentage of students completing the program in five years is 26%, in six years is 36%, in seven years is 13%, and more than seven years is 26%.
  • Cited in an issue of the American Psychologist (2006, vol. 61, issue 2, pp. 143-156) as one of 11 exemplary psychology programs nationally for successful efforts to recruit and retain graduate students of color.
  • Student diversity: approximately 59% of our current doctoral students are ethnic minority individuals, who come from all regions of the country. In 2002, the program was awarded the Suinn Minority Achievement award from APA, which is awarded to programs that are exemplary in the recruitment and retention of diverse students and in the program focus on cultural diversity.
  • Faculty have international reputations in their respective areas of expertise, as reflected in the quality and quantity of publications and conference presentations, service as editors and editorial board members for major psychology journals, service in professional organizations, and success in obtaining grant funding.
  • Quality of student dissertations; APA site visits have noted the high quality of the dissertations completed by students in the program. Students have been successful in having their dissertation research accepted for presentation at national conferences and publication in relevant scientific journals, and are strongly encouraged to do so. See sample dissertation topics of Ph.D. graduates.
  • Library facilities consistent with a major research university, including, for example, over 2 million book volumes and 31,000 periodical subscriptions. The collection is further extended by our participation in a consortium of 27 libraries in Washington and Oregon via Summit with access to over 22 million items.

Student admissions, outcomes, and other data

 

Time to completion for all students entering the program

Outcome Year in which Degrees were Conferred
2010-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 Total
Total number of students with doctoral degree conferred on transcript 3 7 4 4 8 4 9  39
Mean number of years to complete the program 7 7.14  6.5  6  6.95  6.75  6.72  6.77
Median number of years to complete the program 6 6.5 6.5 6 6 5 6 6
Time to Degree Ranges N % N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students in less than 5 years 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0 0
Students in 5 years 1 33 1 13 0 0 1 25 2 25 3 75 2 22  10 26
Students in 6 years 1 33 2 29 2 50 2 50 3 37 0 0 4 45  14 36
Students in 7 years 0 0 2 29 2 50 1 25 0 0 0 0 0 0  5 13
Students in more than 7 years 1 33 2 29 0 0 0 0 3 37 1 25 3 33 10 26

Program Costs

Descriptions 2018-2019 Year
Tuition for full-time students (in-state) $11,761
Tuition for full-time students (out-of-state) $25,193
Tuition per credit hour for part-time students (if applicable) In-State $589 Out of State $1,260
University/institution fees or costs $1,041
Additional estimated fees or costs to students (e.g. books, travel, etc.) $16,074

 

Internship Placement – Table 1

Outcome Year Applied for Internship
2011-2012 2012-2013
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
N %   N %   N %   N %   N %   N % N %
Students who obtained APA/CPA-accredited internships 5 62 7 88 6 88 5 100 8 100 6 86 3 100
Students who obtained APPIC member internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable) 1 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0 0 0
Students who obtained other membership organization internships (e.g. CAPIC) that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0 0 0
Students who obtained internships conforming to CDSPP guidelines that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1  14 0 0
Students who obtained other internships that were not APA/CPA-accredited (if applicable) 1 13 1 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0 0 0
Students who obtained internships 7 88 7 88 6 86 5 100 8 100 7 100 3 100
Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process 8 8 7 5 8 7 3

 

Internship Placement – Table 2

Outcome Year Applied for Internship
2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students who sought or applied for internships including those who withdrew from the application process 8   8 7   5 8   7   3
Students who obtained paid internships 7 88 7 88 6 86 5 100 8 100 7 100 3 100
Students who obtained half-time internships* (if applicable) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 

Attrition*

Variable Year of First Enrollment
2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
N % N % N % N % N % N % N %
Students for whom this is the year of first enrollment (i.e. new students) 5 7 6 8 6 5 7
Students whose doctoral degrees were conferred on their transcripts 4 80 3 43 4 67 7 87 2 33 0 0 0 0
Students still enrolled in program 0 0 1 14 0 0 0 0 4 67 5 100 3 42
Students no longer enrolled for any reason other than conferral of doctoral degree 1 20 3 43 2 33 1 13 0 0 0 0 4 57

*As of January 1, 2016, the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology is no longer admitting new students.

Licensure

Outcome 2008-2018
The Total Number of program graduates (doctoral degree conferred on transcript) between 2 and 10 years ago 41
The number of these graduate (between 2 and 10 years ago) who became licensed psychologists in the past 10 years 36
Licensure percentage 88

Application information

As of January 1, 2016, the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology will no longer be accepting applications for admission, or admitting new students, with closure of the program planned for the future.

GPA and GRE statistics for students admitted in the past seven years:

GPA GRE
Undergrad Grad Verbal Quant
Mean 3.69 3.73 157 151
Median 3.75 3.80 155 147

Previous institutions/degrees of recent students

Year Institution Degree/Specialization
2015 Cohort-7
Assumption College M.A. Counseling
California State University, Fullerton M.S. Counseling
University of Kentucky M.S. Counseling Psychology
University of Wisconsin-Madison B.S. Psychology
Washington State University M.A. Counseling
Washington State University M.A. Counseling
Western Washington University M.S. Mental Health Counseling
2014 Cohort-5
Western Oregon University B.S. Psychology
University of Maryland B.S. Psychology
Central Washington University M.S. Experimental Psychology
Gonzaga University M.A. Community Counseling
Washington State University M.A. Counseling
2013 Cohort-6
Oregon State University M.S. Counseling
University of Capetown BSocSc Psychology
University of Houston B.S. Psychology
Gonzaga University M.A. Community Counseling
Gonzaga University M.A. Marriage and Family Counseling
University of Washington B.A. Psychology

Program faculty (**Counseling Psychology PhD core faculty)

  • ** Brian McNeill, Professor of Counseling Psychology
  • ** Hsin-Ya Liao, Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology
  • ** Brian French, Professor of Educational Psychology
  • Phyllis Erdman, Professor of Counseling Psychology; Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Education; Interim Co-Chair, Department of Educational Leadership, Sport Studies & Counseling/Educational Psychology
  • Olusola Adesope, Associate Professor of Educational Psychology
  • Chad Gotch, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology
  • Kira Carbonneau, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology
  • Zoe Higheagle Strong, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology
  • Jenny LeBeau, Clinical Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology; Assistant Dean of Graduate School

Program students

The total number of doctoral students in the program is generally about 40 (due to program closure, there are currently about 20 students). Each cohort of students is generally capped at a ratio of 1 new student per full-time faculty member. This small student-faculty ratio facilitates faculty-student interaction and increases the quality of clinical and research training. About 57% of current doctoral students are from various visible racial/ ethnic minorities.

The program draws students from across the country. Within the past 10 years, about 42% have come from major Washington universities; 19 % from California universities; 16% from other Western States (e.g., Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico); 7% from the Midwestern states (e.g., Wisconsin, Kansas, Iowa); 11 % from other states (e.g., Florida, Texas, Maryland, Kentucky, Massachusetts, West Virginia); and 5% from foreign countries (e.g., South Africa, Korea, Jamaica).

Examples of recent internship placements

  • Boise VA Medical Center
  • VA Puget Sound
  • University of California – Berkeley, Counseling Center
  • Wright Patteson USAF Medical Center
  • University of South Florida, Counseling Center
  • University of California- Irvine, Counseling Center
  • Bowling Green State University, Counseling Center
  • Duke University, Counseling and Psychological Services
  • University of Notre Dame, University Counseling Center
  • Marin County Health and Human Services
  • University of California – Davis, Student Health and Counseling Services
  • University of Houston – Clear Lake, Counseling Services
  • University of California – Santa Cruz, Counseling and Psychological Services
  • Washington State University, Counseling Services
  • University of Idaho, Counseling and Testing Services
  • University of Northern Colorado, Counseling Center
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa, Counseling & Student Development Center
  • San Jose State University, Counseling and Psychological Services

Sample positions held by recent graduates

  • Clinical Psychologist, California Correctional Health Care Services, CA
  • Licensed Psychologist, Nimiipuu Health, Lewiston, ID
  • Clinical Associate, Seattle Psychology, WA
  • Staff Psychologist, Santa Clara University, CA
  • Psychologist, Duke University, Counseling and Psychological Services, NC
  • Staff Psychologist, University of Iowa, Student Counseling Services, IA
  • Youth and Family Mental Heatlh Therapist, Muckleshoot Behavioral Health Program, WA
  • Staff Psychologist, University of California – Berkeley, Counseling Center, CA
  • Staff Psychologist, Iowa State University, Counseling Center, IA
  • Licensed Psychologist, Washignton State University, Counseling and Psychological Services, WA
  • Staff Psychologist, Appalachian State University, Counseling and Psychological Services, NC
  • Private practice, Palouse Psychological Services, Pullman, WA
  • Registered Psychologist, San Ysidro Health Center, CA
  • Private Practice, Proactive Therapies, LLC, CO
  • Licensed Associate Counselor, Desert Vista Neuropsychological Specialists, PLLC, AZ
  • Psychologist, Kaiser Permanente, San Jose, CA
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Indiana University—Northwest, IN
  • Licensed Psychologist, St. Luke’s Clinic, Behavioral Health Services, ID
  • Registered Psychologist, The Centers, San Diego, CA

Student involvement in publications and presentations

Students have the opportunity to be actively involved in research leading to scientific publications and conference presentations in collaboration with program faculty. The following are recent publications or conference presentations of current students or recent program graduates, co-authored with program faculty. In addition, see sample dissertation topics of Ph.D. graduates of recent graduates of the program.

Publications (faculty, students, and alumni in bold)

2018 and In Press

Bai, L., & Liao, H.-Y. (2018). The relation between interest congruence and college major satisfaction: Evidence from the basic interest measures. Journal of Career Assessment. Advanced online publication. doi:10.1177/1069072718793966

Erdman, P., & Jacobson, S. (2018). Teaching social skills and communication to adolescents through equine interventions. In K. S. Trotter, & J. N. Baggerly (Eds.), Equine assisted mental health interventions: Harnessing solutions to common problems (pp. 205-211). New York, NY: Routledge.

Finch, W. H., & French, B. F. (2018). A simulation investigation of the performance of invariance assessment using equivalence testing procedures. Structural Equation Modeling: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 25, 673-686.

Frey, K., & Higheagle Strong, Z. (2018). Aggression predicts changes in peer victimization that vary by form and function. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 46, 305-31.

Gotch, C. M., & Roduta Roberts, M. (in press). A review of recent research on individual-level score reports. Educational Measurement: Issues and Practic

Kim, T., Hutchison, A., Gerstein, L., Liao, H.-Y., Cheung, R. W.-L., Cinamon, R. G., Michael, R., Mastroianni, E., Bellare, Y. & Collins, R. M. (in press). Hong Kong women’s perception of their future. British Journal of Guidance and Counseling.

Lemberger-Truelove, M., Carbonneau, K. J., & Selig, J. P. (2018). The role of social-emotional mediators on middle school students’ academic growth as fostered by an evidence-based intervention. Journal of Counseling and Development, 96, 27-40.

Munson, S., Barabasz, A., & Barabasz, M. (2018). Ability of hypnosis to facilitate movement through stages of change for smoking cessation. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 66, 56-82.

Robb, J. L., Chou, C.-C., Johnson, L. G., Liao, H.-Y., & Tan, S.-Y. (2018). Mediating effects of social support and coping between perceived and internalized stigma for substance users. Journal of Rehabilitation, 84, 14-21.

Schroeder, K., Stroud, D., & Erdman, P. (2018). Leading equine-assisted mental health groups: An exploratory survey of practitioner characteristics, practices and
professional development. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 68, 204-214.

Strand, P., Gotch, C. M., French, B. F., & Beaver, J. L. (in press). Factor structure and invariance of an adolescent’ risks and needs assessment. Assessment. Advanced online publication. doi:11.1177/10731911177006021

Strand, P. S., Gotch, C. M., & McCurley, C. (in press). Understanding school trauancy: Risk-need latent profiles of adolescents. Assessment. Advanced online publication. doi:10.1177/107391116672329

Su, R., Tay, L., Liao, H.-Y., & Zhang, Q., & Rounds, J. (in press). Toward a dimensional model of vocational interests. Journal of Applied Psychology.

2017

Adesope, O. O., Trevisan, D., & Sundararajan, N. (2017). Rethinking the use of tests: A meta-analysis of the testing effect. Review of Educational Research, 87, 659 – 701.

Adesope, O. O., Cavagnetto, A., Anguiano, C., Hunsu, N., & Lloyd, J. (2017). The comparative effects of computer-based concept maps, refutational texts and expository texts on science learning. Journal of Educational Computing Research55, 46 – 59.

Allik, J., Church, A. T., Ortiz, F. A., Rossier, J., Hrebickova, M., de Fruyt, F., Realo, A., & McCrae, R. R. (2017). Mean profiles of the NEO Personality Inventory. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48, 402-420.

Austin, B., French, B., Adesope, O. O., & Gotch, C. (2017). Use of standard deviations as predictors in models using large-scale international data sets. The Journal of Experimental Education, 85, 559–573.

Barabasz, A., & Barabasz, M. (2017). Hypnotic phenomena and deepening techniques. In G. R. Elkins (Ed.), Handbook of medical and psychological hypnosis: Foundations, applications, and professional issues (pp. 69-76). New York: NY: Springer.

Church, A. T. (Ed.) (2017). The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Church, A. T. (2017). Personality across cultures: Historical overview and current topics. In A. T. Church (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures (pp. 1-45). Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Church, A. T., & Katigbak, M. S. (2017). Trait consistency and validity across cultures. In A. T. Church (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures (pp. 279-308). Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Frey, K., Higheagle Strong, Z., & Onyewuenyi, A. (2017). Individual and classroom norms differentially predict proactive and reactive aggression: A functional analysis. Journal of Educational Psychology, 109, 178-190.

Grogan, G., Barabasz, A., Barabasz, M., & Christensen, C. (2017). Effects of hypnosis on regression to primary-process thinking. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 62, 32-42.

Lee, J. H., & Church, A. T. (2017). Social anxiety in Asian Americans: Integrating personality and cultural factors. Asian American Journal of Psychology, 8, 103-114.

Liao, H.-Y., Spanierman, L. B., Harlow, A. J., & Neville, H. A. (2017). Do parents matter? Examination of White college students’ intergroup experiences and attitudes. The Counseling Psychologist, 45, 193-212.

Locke, K. D., Church, A. T., Mastor, K. A., Curtis, G. J., Sadler, P., McDonald, K., Vargas- Flores, J. D., Ibáñez-Reyes, J., Morio, H., Reyes, J. A., Cabrera, H. F., Arias, R.
M., Rincon, B. C., Arias, N. A., Muñoz, A., & Ortiz, F. (2017). Cross-situational self- consistency in nine cultures: The importance of separating influences of social norms and distinctive dispositions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 43, 1033-1049.

McNeill, B. W., McCubbin, L., & Sevedge, S. (2017). Mestiza/o, Indigenous and Liberation Perspectives on Social Issues. In A. Blume (Ed.), Social issues in living color: Challenges and solutions from the perspective of ethnic minority psychology (pp. 49-74). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.

Vogel, D. L., Heath, P. J., Engel K. E., Brenner, R. E., Strass, H. A., Al-Darmaki, F. R., Armstrong, P. I., Galbraith, N., Galbraith, V., Baptista, M. N., Gonçalves, M., Liao, H.-Y., Mackenzie, C., Mak, W. W. S., Rubin, M., Topkaya, N., Wang, Y.-F., & Zlati, A. (2017). Cross-cultural validation of the Perceptions of Stigmatization by Others for Seeking Help (PSOSH) scale. Stigma and Health. Advanced online publication. doi:10.1037/sah0000119

Vogel, D. L., Strass, H. A., Al-Darmaki, F. R., Armstrong, P. I., Baptista, M. N., Brenner, R. E., Gonçalves, M., Heath, P. J., Lannin, D. G., Liao, H.-Y., Mackenzie, C., Mak, W. W. S., Rubin, M., Topkaya, N., Wade, N. G., Wang, Y.-F, & Zlati, A. (2017). Stigma associated with seeking mental health services: Examination across ten countries/regions. The Counseling Psychologist, 45, 170-192.

Wang, Z., & Adesope, O. O. (2017). Do focused self-explanation prompts overcome seductive details? A multimedia study. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 20, 47-57.

2016

Abdul, B., Adesope, O. O., VanWie, B. J., & Thiessen, D. (2016). Comparing the effects of two active learning approaches in an engineering education classroom. International Journal of Engineering Education, 32, 1-16.

Barabasz, A., & Barabasz, M. (2016). Induction technique: Beyond simple response to suggestion. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 59, 204-213.

Barabasz, A., Barabasz, M., & Christensen, C. (2016). Resistance to healing the wounded self: A psychodynamic rationale for a targeted treatment. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 59, 88-99.

Buchanan, A., McCubbin, L. D., & Adesope, O. O. (2016). Exploratory factor analysis of the Trauma and Attachment Belief Scale among partners of service members. Traumatology, 22, 214.

Chronister, J., Chou, C.-C., Fitzgerald, S. D., & Liao, H.-Y. (2016). Social support and persons with psychiatric disabilities: A cluster analysis. Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, 47(3), 29-40.

Craft, S., & Garcia, Y. E., (2016) Navigating through the distance: How to counsel clients in nonproximal romantic relationships (NPRRs). In S. Tettegah & Y. Garcia (Eds.) Emotions and technology: Communication of feelings through, with, and for technology (pp. 211-224). Taramani, Chennai: Elsevier.

French, B. F., Gotch, C. M., Immekus, J. C. & Beaver, J. L. (2016). The development and investigation of the psychometric properties of a measure of teamwork among high school students. Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling, 58, 455-470.

French, B. F., Finch, W. H., Randel, B., Hand, B., & Gotch, C. M. (2016). Measurement invariance techniques to enhance measurement sensitivity. International Journal of Quantitative Research in Education, 3, 79-93.

Hunsu, N. J., Adespe, O. O., & Bayly, D. J. (2016). A meta-analysis of the effects of audience response systems (clicker-based technologies) on cognition and affect. Computers & Education, 94, 102-119.

Kogan, L., Schaefer, K., Erdman, P., & Schoenfeld-Tacher, R. (2016). University counseling center’s perceptions and experiences pertaining to emotional support animals. Journal of College Student Psycotherapy, 30, 268-283.

Liao, H.-Y., Hong, Y.-y., & Rounds, J. (2016). Perception of subtle racism: The role of group status and legitimizing ideologies. The Counseling Psychologist, 44, 237-266.

Slevc, L. R., Davey, N. S., & Linck, J. A., (2016): A new look at “the hard problem” of bilingual lexical access: evidence for language-switch costs with univalent stimuli, Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 28, 385-395.

Slevc, L. R., Davey, N. S., Buschkuehl, M., & Jaeggi, S. M. (2016). Tuning the Mind: Exploring the connections between musical ability and Executive Functions. Cognition, 152, 199-211

Wang, Z., & Adesope, O. O. (2016). Exploring the effects of seductive details with the 4-phase model of interest. Learning and Motivation, 55, 65-77.

Presentations and workshops (faculty, students, and alumni in bold)

2018

Erdman, P. (2018, August). Section on Human–Animal Interaction: The field of human animal Interactions—how to get involved. In M. Rowland (Chair), Critical issues in counseling psychology section roundtables. Symposium presented at the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Erdman, P., & Schafer, K. (2018, August). Emotional support animals and service dogs: Prevalence and impact in universities. In L. Kogan (Chair), Emotional support animals and service dogs—Definitions, roles, and regulations. Symposium presented at the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Gotch, C. M., Poppen, M., Razo, J. E., & Modderman, S. (2018, April). Teacher formative assessment self-efficacy through a professional learning experience. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York, NY.

Guadarrama, J. (2018, April). The healing power of social support. Keynote address at the Community Health Workers Conference by the Washington State Department of Health, Lynnwood, WA

Guadarrama, J. (2018, April). Getting to change: Motivational Interviewing. Training at the Community Health Workers Conference by the Washington State Department of Health, Lynnwood, WA

Liao, H.-Y., & Schacter, M. A. (2018, April). The role of face and relational self-construal on stigma, and help-seeking: Examination across five countries/regions. In M. Shea (Chair), Examining cultural and structural barriers to seeking psychological counseling: Three studies across six countries. Symposium presented at the Western Psychological Association Annual Convention, Portland, OR.

McNeill, B. (2018, April). Mestiza/o, indigenous, and liberation perspectives on social issues. Distinguished Speaker presented at the Western Psychological Association Annual Convention, Portland, OR.

Munson, S. O. (2018, August). Ability of hypnosis to facilitate movement through stages of change for smoking cessation. Hilgard Award Address presented at the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

2017

Barabasz, A., Barabasz, M., & Munson, S. O. (2017, October). Ability of hypnosis to facilitate movement through stages of change for smoking cessation. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, Chicago, Illinois.

Carbonneau, K. J., Abercrombie, S., & Hushman, C. J. (2017, April). Academic risk taking a trait and is it distinct from need for cognition? Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Antonio, TX.

Craft, S. A. (2017, August). Role of the state psychological association in assisting students with prior violations. In Y. E. Garcia (Chair), Students and licensure applicants with previous misdemeanors or felonies. Symposium presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

Erdman, P. (2017, August). Attachment theory and coping with pet grief and loss. Presented at the symposium- pet loss and grief at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington Dc.

Erdman, P., Kogan, L., Blazina, C., & Wright, M. (2017, August). K9 police units: The human-animal bond and implications for veterinary practice. Poster presented at the annual convention of American Psychological Association, Washington DC.

Gotch, C., Lyon, C., McLean, C., & Wylie, C. (2017, September). Educator professional learning in a balanced assessment system. Presented at the National Council on Measurement in Education Special Conference on Classroom Assessment and Large-Scale Psychometrics, Lawrence, KS.

Gotch, C. M., & Roduta Roberts, M. (2017, April). A review of recent empirical research on individual-level score reports. Presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education, San Antonio, TX.

Guadarrama, J. (2017, June). Acceptance Commitment Therapy seminar (Spanish). Training presented at the Dioceses of Orange Summer Institute, Orange, CA.

Guadarrama, J. (2017, April). Getting to change: Motivational Interviewing. Training presented at the 2017 Science of Hope Conference by the Foundation for Healthy Generations, Seattle, WA.

Guadarrama, J. (2017, March). Getting to change: Motivational Interviewing. Training at the Community Health Workers Conference from the Washington State Department of Health, Pasco, WA.

Higheagle Strong, Z., & Fryberg, S. (2017, May). How do teachers’ behaviors and classroom environments promote identity safety, growth mindset, and performance for underserved students? Presented at the National Mindset Scholars Network Convening, Chicago, IL.

Higheagle Strong, Z., & McFarland, J. (2017, May). The Nez Perce Mentoring Project: Culturally responsive mentoring. Presented at the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Convention, Portland, OR.

Jenkins, M. J., Liao, H.-Y., Bai, L., Schacter, M. A., Hu, C., Yang, C.-C., & Rounds, J. (2017, August). Cross-cultural comparison of vocational interests- Test of measurement invariance in basic interests. Poster presented at the Div 17 Student Poster Session at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington DC.

Jenkins, M. J., Liao, H.-Y., & Cho, G. (2017, June). Dogs, smart phones, and sociability: Effects on passerby greeting behaviors. Poster presented at the International Society for Anthrozoology (ISAZ) Conference, Davis, CA.

Kaivan, N. C., & Liu, J. (2017, January). Feeling othered in your own space: Causes, consequences and manifestations of oppression. Difficult dialogue presented at the National Multicultural Conference & Summit, Portland, OR.

Kaivan, N. C., Sheldon, R., Walton, A., & Tsong, Y. (2017, August). A qualitative examination of growth and development from studying abroad. Poster presented at the annual convention of American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

Liao, H.-Y., Ni, J., & Rounds, J. (2017, August). Linking interest and personality- Use of basic interests as an integrative framework. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington D.C.

Liao, H.-Y., Kwan, K.-L. K., & Davey, N. S. (2017, August). Constructing occupational prestige: Contextual and cultural perspectives. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington DC.

San Miguel, A. (2017, March). Efficacy of manualized hypnosis in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Poster presented at the WSU Academic Showcase, Pullman, WA.

San Miguel, A. (January, 2017). Building relationships, promoting health: An empirical evaluation of a culturally based substance abuse prevention and outreach program with multicultural university students. Poster presented at the National Multicultural Conference and Summit, Portland, OR.

Thew, K., & Craft, S. (2015, November). Incorporating animal assisted therapy into mental health practice. Symposium presented at Washington State Counseling Association Conference, Spokane, WA.

2016

Adesope, O. O., Trevisan, D. T., & Sundararajan, N. (2016, April). Are practice tests effective for learning? Re-examining the testing effect! Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Washington, DC.

Barabasz, A. (2016, March) Hypnotherapeutic techniques refresher. Invited workshop presented at the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis Annual Workshops, St. Louis, MO.

Barabasz, A. (2016, March) Evidence-based ego state therapy for PTSD. Invited plenary session address presented at the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis Annual Scientific Meeting, St. Louis, MO.

Carbonneau, K. J., Marley, S. C., & Boothe, C. (2016, August). Instructional guidance and perceptual richness of manipulatives influence learner persistence. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology Association, Denver, CO.

Davey, N. S., Bai, L., & Liao, H.-Y. (2016, August). Back to basics: Towards an emic-etic approach in cross-cultural vocational assessment. Poster presented at the Div 17 Student Poster Session at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.

DeSanto, B. S., Kaivan, N. C., & Tsong, Y. (2016, August). Cognitive flexibility changes while studying abroad. Poster presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.

Erdman, P, & Mixter, P. (2016) WSU’s culture of academic integrity: An update. Invited speaker for the CVM Teaching Academy, Brown Bag Series.

Erdman, P. (2016, August) Men and their dogs: A new understanding of man’s best friend. Discussant of symposium presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.

Erdman, P. (2016, August). The puzzling world of human-animal interaction research: The who, what and how. Section roundtable presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.

Gotch, C. M., & McLean, C. (2016, April). Teacher outcomes from a statewide initiative to build assessment literacy. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Washington, DC.

Grogan, G., Barabasz, A., & Barabasz, M. (2016, August) Effects of hypnosis on regression to primary process thinking. Presented at the American Psychological Association National Convention, Denver, CO.

Guadarrama, J. (2016, July). Acceptance Commitment Therapy Seminar (Spanish). Training presented for Community Health Worker Coalition for Migrant and Refugees, Kennewick, WA.

Guadarrama, J. (2016, June). Getting to change: Motivational Interviewing. Training presented for the North Central Washington Youth Prevention & Education, Okanogan, Moses Lake, & Wenatchee, WA.

Haghighi, M. (2016, February) Immigration, culture, stigma, and mental health: A predictive model. Poster presented at the annual Three Minute Thesis Competition, College of Education, Washington State University, Pullman, WA.

Haghighi, M., Liao, H.-Y., & Louie, J. (2016, July). Re-conceptualizing stigma and help-seeking from the framework of face. Presented at the APA Div 45 Research Conference, Palo Alto, CA.

Higheagle Strong, Z. (2016, April). Cultural responsive mentoring for college and career readiness. Workshop presented at the Washington Indian Education Association Conference, Ocean Shores, Washington.

Kaivan, N. C., Zabriskie, A. & Hornbrook, J. (2016, November). Mental health care while abroad. Presented at the annual council on International Educational Exchange conference, Los Angeles, California.

Lopez, J., & McNeill, B. (2016, September). The elevated scales on the MMPI-2 with Mexican populations. Poster presented at the National Latino Psychological Association (NLPA), Orlando, Florida.

McNeill, B. W. (2015/2016, August). The integrative developmental model of clinical supervision, in H. Levenson & A. Inman (Chairs), Supervision—Master supervisors of various orientations show and discuss their supervision session videos. Symposium presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Toronto, Canada, Denver, CO.

Preciado, L., & McNeill, B. (2016, October). Self-compassion: A protective factor for the persistence of Latina and Latino undergraduate students. Poster presented at the National Latina/o Psychological Association, Orlando, FL.

San Miguel, A. (2016, October) Efficacy of manualized hypnosis in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Poster presented at the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis Conference Annual Workshops and Scientific Program, Boston, MA.

San Miguel, A. (2016, July). Family stress and community collaboration: Ways to support a child in need. Presented (in Spanish) at the “Building Bridges: Construyendo Puentes” 2-day conference at Colegio Militar Eloy Alfaro (Eloy Alfaro Military High School), Quito, Ecuador.

San Miguel, A. (2016, April). Ethical research with people of color: Implications for clinical/therapeutic applications. Presented at the annual WSU Indigenous Convention, Pullman, WA.

San Miguel, A. (2016, March) Building relationships, promoting health: A preliminary evaluation of a culturally based substance abuse prevention and outreach program in a university setting. Poster presented at the annual Collaborative Perspectives on Addiction Meeting presented by The Society of Addiction Psychology (APA Division 50), San Diego, CA.

Schacter, M. A., Davey, N. S., Haghighi, M., Gancinia, A. D., & Liao, H.-Y. (2016, March). Culture, stigma, and help-seeking: Examination across five countries/regions. Poster presented at the GPSA Research Exposition, Washington State University.

Schacter, M. A., Liao, H.-Y., Vogel, D. L., Mak, W. W. S., Wang, Y.-F., Topkaya, N., & Zlati, A. (2016, August). Culture, stigma, and help-seeking: Examination across five countries/regions. Poster presented at the Div 17 Student Poster Session at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Denver, CO.

Shah, N., & Hale, M. (2016). Not my America: Out-grouping in the context of Islamophobia. Presented at the Globalization, Diversity, and Education Conference, Spokane, WA.

Program newsletters

Summer 2015 Counseling Psychology Newsletter

Fall 2012 Counseling Psychology Newsletter

Fall 2010 Counseling Psychology Newsletter

APA contact information

The doctoral program in counseling psychology has been continually accredited by the American Psychological Association since 1990. For information about our accreditation status, you can contact the Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association.

Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation

750 First St, NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: 202.336.5979
Email: apaaccred@apa.org

Helpful links

Washington State University